Space Shift (2011) has evolved from a project entitled Imagining Flood, which offers personal reflection on the flooding affecting Bangkok. The scenes in this collection take place on the edge of the city near a motorway, where temporary housing units had been erected to provide support for those whose homes had been damaged by the flooding.

When I first arrived at the location, I was immediately struck by how the futuristic the setting appeared - the fluorescent lighting that glowed against the giant concrete structures at night felt reminiscent of the worlds captured in sci-fi manga comics or the sleeping capsules for the overnight businessmen in Japan. There was something other worldly about the setting alongside a pervading sense of stillness that contrasted to the scenes of hysteria that had been portrayed in the media.

During my visits to the area I spoke to many of the locals and inhabitants, and found the adaptability of the small populace reaffirming. One inhabitant, Auntie Aree, had been living in Space Shift for over a month and set up her block with all the household appliances one would find in a modern home including a fridge, gas stove, rice cooker, kettle, and television. It's comfortable home just like home, and the construction company (that had built the elevated highway parts) have allowed us to tap into their electricity free of use.

In spite of the optimistic and stoic attitude of the people, I was still conscious of the harmful effect the ongoing political crisis is having on dealing with providing support to those whose lives had been turned upside down by the flood.